CARPE DIEM: Andy Willis is bringing his lessons about working from anywhere to the masses, through a business mentoring program and now a book.

CARPE DIEM: Andy Willis is bringing his lessons about working from anywhere to the masses, through a business mentoring program and now a book.

'Work is not a place': Andy Willis is seizing the day, sharing a message

Working from anywhere philosophy shared by South Coast business mentor, writer

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Making more time to live is central to the philosophy Mr Willis has been sharing with friends and small business owners over the last handful of years.

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Andy Willis is a man with a message. And that message goes beyond the "Carpe Diem" he has tattooed on his forearm.

"Seizing the day" and making more time to live is central to the philosophy Mr Willis has been sharing with friends and small business owners over the last handful of years.

The business mentor and now published author wants others to get out of the "working to live" mindset in order to enjoy living - and in doing so become much more productive.

He speaks from lived experience too.

A decade ago, Mr Willis ran a very successful conference and event management business, organising huge international conferences for large - and well-paying - clients.

"The only problem was I worked seven days a week, with very little time for myself and my family.

"Fast forward a few years and life circumstances changed. I was now a single man.

"In an airport travelling between events I came across a book call the Four-Hour Work Week - now I still don't believe a four-hour work week is possible, but the notion of working less and living more really hit home."

Avid cyclist Andy Willis spent months at a time in the French Alps while still running a successful conference management business.

Avid cyclist Andy Willis spent months at a time in the French Alps while still running a successful conference management business.

Mr Willis explored various software packages and online business platforms, trying to figure out which would work for him and allow him to free up time from the seven-day grind to better enjoy the things he actually loved doing.

For anyone who knows Mr Willis, you would know that would be cycling and travelling...and more cycling.

He made a commitment to the "working from anywhere" (WFA) concept and spent a month in the French Alps, still running his conference business, but with the mountain roads to explore in his down time.

"I booked my tickets. I rode my bike. Nothing went wrong."

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The following year it was two months in France. Then three.

Now, although he was making that work for him, he gave up that lucrative business to share his new-found passion and experience with others. Even better, he's already done the legwork on what works and what doesn't.

A full house at the Tathra Hotel for the official launch of The Carpe Diem Way.

A full house at the Tathra Hotel for the official launch of The Carpe Diem Way.

"The Carpe Diem Way: The ultimate guide to making time for life" was launched on Saturday at the Tathra Hotel on NSW's Far South Coast, where Mr Willis makes his home - when he's not travelling the countryside in his WFA van, with Belle the Jack Russell puppy at his side.

A packed room heard of his motivations behind the "WFA Life" and his mentor courses. Some of his clients also shared their own success stories after implementing Mr Willis's lessons and software processes.

"The biggest thing I discovered wasn't about where you worked, but also when," Mr Willis said.

"I was seeing my friends deferring living life until later, people trapped in their work.

"We're all about working hard now to make money for when we retire - when we think we'll have enough time to enjoy it.

"But that doesn't make sense. We should be living now."

Participants at the recent WFA TagAlong Camp.

Participants at the recent WFA TagAlong Camp.

One of the ways Mr Willis is sharing the message - and living the message - is through "Tag Along Camps".

Last week he was joined by a dozen business owners from Ulladulla to Eden at Tathra Beachside caravan park where they not only continued to run their business from afar, but enjoyed group activities and collaborative info sessions.

Teaching the tech is very simple. It's changing the mindset that takes longer. - Andy Willis

Bega pizza shop owner and WFA Tag Along participant Mal Barnes said at first he wasn't sure how the WFA premise could work for him, being such a hands-on, customer-service focused business.

"I love having that contact with the customers, but the 'a-ha' moment came when I realised I can still run the business and get my life in order at the same time," Mr Barnes said.

Mr Willis said he gets "a whole lot of joy" in helping people and seeing those a-ha moments, joy in seeing people doing things differently.

Andy Willis and his puppy Belle

Andy Willis and his puppy Belle

"It's not about making yourself obsolete. If you want to make yourself obsolete, sell your business.

"People get into business because of a sense of purpose.

"My life purpose is to share, not just with other business owners and entrepreneurs, the message to make the most of every moment.

"Teaching the tech is very simple. It's changing the mindset that takes longer.

"This is about setting up your business so it's not wholly reliant on you, but 'letting go' is really challenging."

The Carpe Diem Way is available now from several Far South Coast book retailers and online at WFA.life

While calling Tathra home, Andy Willis is a man with a message of freeing yourself from a work "place".

While calling Tathra home, Andy Willis is a man with a message of freeing yourself from a work "place".

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