James, Ivy, Sara, and Aaron Johnston made the move to Wagga from Ashfield in Sydney, and they haven't regretted their decision one bit. Picture: Les Smith

James, Ivy, Sara, and Aaron Johnston made the move to Wagga from Ashfield in Sydney, and they haven't regretted their decision one bit. Picture: Les Smith

Why wouldn't you want to live in regional Australia?

Voice of Real Australia: Why wouldn't you want to live in regional Australia?

Population
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It's pretty nice out here.

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James, Ivy, Sara, and Aaron Johnston made the move to Wagga from Ashfield in Sydney, and they haven't regretted their decision one bit. Picture: Les Smith

James, Ivy, Sara, and Aaron Johnston made the move to Wagga from Ashfield in Sydney, and they haven't regretted their decision one bit. Picture: Les Smith

Research from the Regional Australia Institute has shone a light on the myth that Australia's rural population is in decline.

Showing in fact, although cities such as Newcastle and the Gold Coast were classified as regional, it was the small rural councils who had the largest percentage of their populations made up of newcomers.

And really, I'm surprised at the surprise.

Why wouldn't you want to live in regional Australia?

I can't claim full regional status, I moved to the Blue Mountains seven years ago (I'd say Sydney's fringe, but a Sydney-sider thinks it's a rural holiday so I guess it's all about perspective) and life's never been better.

Sure the grocery shop is an hours round trip and mobile reception is a bit patchy, but I've got all the space in the world and bush walks for hours at the back fence. What's not to love?

And for those who couldn't live without a coffee within walking distance, rural living doesn't have to cost you that. There's plenty of regional towns with all the conveniences of the city.

And it seems the younger generations have caught on to this.

The RAI research revealed regional Australia attracted more people aged 20-35 than it lost to the capital cities during the last two Census periods.

One who made the move was millennial Sara Johnston, who started a family in Sydney, where she lived in a "very cramped" two-bedroom apartment with her husband and two children.

But a move to Wagga Wagga in NSW's Riverina has changed all that.

"Now we've got our own house, backyard, sandpit, swings, which we never would have been able to have in Sydney," Mrs Johnston said.

So if you are still fighting the hustle and bustle and losing hope of ever owning a home, then maybe it's time to think about heading bush, it's pretty nice out there

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