PICKING: Garry Richards picking raspberries at Kookaburra Estate. Photo: Jay-Anna Mobbs

PICKING: Garry Richards picking raspberries at Kookaburra Estate. Photo: Jay-Anna Mobbs

How does raspberry wine sound? Mudgee berries hit the right note with new product launch

Mudgee berries hit the right note with new product launch

Sustainability
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Kookaburra Estate is celebrating the release of a series of products uncommon in the region.

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Admitting that he's 'bad at retiring', Garry Richards and his wife Kate have owned Kookaburra Estate in Mudgee for about 15 years. This month they're celebrating the release of a series of products uncommon in the region.

Berry liqueurs, berry-infused vodka, raspberry wine and jams are all now available from the local producer who a few years ago didn't know what to do with the abundance of raspberries they were growing.

"We had this massive crop and we didn't know what to do with them, so we did a bit of research and came up with originally a wine and a liqueur," Mr Richards said.

"The first batch [of wine] was absolutely terrible. I got some advice from a couple of winemakers around town and they told me what was wrong with it. They could taste it and tell me straight away how to fix it."

RED: Sone of the lineup of liqueurs, wine and vodka. Photo: Supplied

RED: Sone of the lineup of liqueurs, wine and vodka. Photo: Supplied

Garry and Kate took their products to last year's Flavours of Mudgee event as a test run and Garry said they were 'staggered' at the positive response they received. He said their success lies in the volume of berries they put in each product, and makes sure to mention they're fresh and locally-grown.

Garry explained the process of turning berries into wine and liqueur is different to what people expect with grapes.

"The thing about berries is when you grow grapes and make products, you pick them once or twice a year. Berries you have to pick a minimum of every second day. So we're actually making the liqueuers during summer we're making that and wine, every week," Mr Richards said.

"And so, we make a batch of liqueur and we carry it - and the wine - we carry it through so we add each batch to the previous batch so every bottle we make this season tastes the same. But you do have to do it weekly because your berries don't last long."

What can you expect from a raspberry-based red wine? Garry said the taste is surprisingly tart, but noted too that other berry wines sometimes add berries to a grape wine, whereas this product is exclusively berry-based.

"The best way I describe it is we call it a semi-dry because it is a bit sweet, but then it has a tartness to it thanks to the raspberries," he said.

You can purchase the products online at their website and they offer free delivery within Mudgee.

The story How does raspberry wine sound? Mudgee berries hit the right note with new product launch first appeared on Mudgee Guardian.

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